Benjamin Johnson

Does social media use lead to greater life satisfaction or self-esteem? Does it lead to better moods? When does social media use lead to positive or negative emotional responses? It is a well-known perspective that social media is bad for one’s self-esteem and overall mental well-being. But existing evidence for…

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Posted: May 13, 2021

Benjamin Johnson, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications Advertising assistant professor, CJC doctoral students Susanna Lee and Ben Vollmer and Cen April Yue, Ph.D. 2020, are the authors of “Impartial Endorsements: Influencer and Celebrity Declarations of Non-Sponsorship and Honesty” published in Computers in Human Behavior on May 6. The authors studied…

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Posted: May 12, 2021

Benjamin Johnson, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications Advertising assistant professor, is the author of “Look Up, Look Down: Articulating Inputs and Outputs of Social Media Social Comparison” published in the Journal of Communication Technology in March 2021. According to Johnson, “Computer-mediated social comparisons have been identified as a…

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Posted: March 31, 2021

Benjamin Johnson, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications Advertising assistant professor, is a co-author of “Stories Enlarge the Experience of Self: Evidence for the Temporarily Expanded Boundaries of the Self (TEBOTS) Model, a chapter in the book The Oxford Handbook of Entertainment Theory to be published by Oxford University…

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Posted: February 15, 2021

Benjamin Johnson, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications Advertising assistant professor, is a co-author of “Overcoming Challenges and Leveraging Opportunities” published in Media Psychology on Jan. 25. Johnson, Sun Joo Ahn, Marina Krcmar and Leonard Reinecke, the new editors of the publication from 2021 to 2024, reflect on…

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Posted: February 3, 2021

Benjamin Johnson, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications Advertising assistant professor, is quoted in “Spoiler Alert: Spoilers Can Be Good for Business” published on Morning Consult on Dec. 22. The article focuses on entertainment programming spoilers. Many viewers seek them out to help them decide whether or not…

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Posted: December 22, 2020

The global COVID-19 pandemic has caused anxiety and stress in most people, but college students specifically have had to learn to cope with uncertainty and upheaval from their normal routine. This emotional rollercoaster has caused an increase in general media consumption as those effected by the pandemic seek ways to…

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Posted: December 22, 2020

Benjamin Johnson, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications Advertising assistant professor, is the co-author of “Media for Coping During COVID-19 Social Distancing: Stress, Anxiety and Psychological Well-Being” published in Frontiers in Psychology on Nov. 10. Johnson, Allison Eden, Leonard Reinecke and Sara Grady, using data from a cross-sectional…

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Posted: November 10, 2020

Can star ratings for political content on platforms like Amazon alter our feelings towards others with similar or opposing political preferences? When we see ratings that disagree with our own, are we more likely to believe the ratings are manipulated? And when we see ratings that agree with our own,…

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Posted: October 14, 2020

Benjamin Johnson, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications Advertising assistant professor, is the co-author of “Online Products and Consumers: Partisan Ratings and Mechanisms for Affective Polarization” published in Telematics and Informatics on July 19. Johnson and Rachel Neo from the University of Hawaii at Manoa conducted two experiments…

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Posted: August 11, 2020

Benjamin Johnson, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications Advertising assistant professor, was selected as one of three special issue editors for “This is (Not) Fine,” an upcoming special issue of Psychology of Popular Media. The special issue will curate research on the collision of current crises and popular…

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Posted: July 21, 2020

Spending time watching TV, hanging out with friends or scrolling through social media can be viewed as a waste of time and energy. But what if the use of this leisure time actually helps improve self-control (e.g. capacity to self-regulate behavior) and can satisfy intrinsic psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and…

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Posted: April 27, 2020