Research and Theory Master's

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As one of nation’s oldest and most respected Communications programs in the country, we know what it means to drive new knowledge in the face of an ever-changing uber-connected communications landscape. It takes a brain for the big picture rooted in theory, research, and decision-making skills. It takes a passion for expertise and specialization rooted in rigor. Our Research and Theory Master’s combines big picture awareness with specialization to create some of the most well-rounded and well-regarded academics in the nation. That’s what greatness takes.

The goal of our research Masters is simple: shape competitive, developed academics that aspire to greatness in communications. As a master’s student of our program, you’re not only affiliated with a Top 10 university and college: you’re surrounded by a wide range of entrepreneurial colleagues, innovative research, and industry facilities. From the award-winning Innovation News Center to the first-of-its-kind generational agency “The Agency,” you’ll be surrounded by the theory and practice needed for a satisfying, life-long career at the cutting edge of communications.

The program offers six Master of Arts in Mass Communication (MAMC) specializations:  Advertising, Journalism, Public Relations, Telecommunication, International and Science/Health.  We also offer a joint JD/MAMC degree.  For more information, click on the links on the left.

CJC Insights

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It’s About How Employees Feel


More and more companies today are striving to develop an emotional culture which emphasizes how employees feel. Does emotional culture truly matter for an organization’s success?

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Why People Use Instagram and What Brands Can Learn


Instagram “should make consumers feel good about themselves,” says Huan Chen, assistant professor of Advertising, in a new study on how young consumers experience Instagram and their perceptions of marketing on the platform.

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How to Counter Violence in Media


Seeing violence in media that sanitize, justify or trivialize violent acts may normalize it and make it more enjoyable. Frank Waddell, assistant professor of Journalism, worked with a team of researchers to examine techniques for reducing the effects of viewing violence in media.

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Readers Prefer Privacy Over Doxxing


News organizations, in pursuing their role as watchdogs, have at times revealed an individual’s personal information in their stories, known as  “doxxing.”  Jasmine McNealy, assistant professor of Telecommunication, examines the reaction of the online users to doxxing by media organizations in this case study.

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