Terry Anderson to speak at Graham Center on March 16

Published: January 21st, 2015

Terry Anderson

Terry Anderson

In March 1985, Associated Press reporter Terry Anderson was abducted off the streets in Beirut and held at the mercy of his Hezbollah Shiite captors. He lived for nearly seven years in chains wondering fearfully if each day would be his last. But his spirit soared beyond captivity, and he never gave up, nor did those who loved him. And now, a free man and adjunct lecturer in the College, Anderson will tell the harrowing and poignant story of his survival. The talk will be on Monday, March 16 at 6 p.m. in the Pugh Hall Ocora. The event and parking are free and open to the public. The event is sponsored by the College and the Bob Graham Center for Public Service.

Category: College News

A Statement from the College on Charlie Hebdo publication

Published: January 14th, 2015

Using terrorism to restrict freedom of speech and the movement of information is nothing new to the media industry. The journalists in Paris have experienced what many organizations fear as they continue to tell the stories of the world around them.

As Charlie Hebdo proudly publishes its first edition since the killing of 12 colleagues at its Paris office, the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications supports the newspaper’s effort to fight this fear by continuing to publish.

“This is a masterful stroke for freedom of expression,” said UF CJC Dean Diane McFarlin. “These storytellers are honoring their colleagues who perished by exercising the rights that undergird democratic society.”

Terry Anderson, adjunct faculty member and a former Associated Press reporter who was held hostage in Beirut from 1985 to 1991 and chronicled that time in the book “Den of Lions,” said: “Freedom of speech and freedom of the press mean nothing if they only protect utterances we agree with. They must also protect those whose words we find distasteful or even offensive.

“There is absolutely no excuse for punishing people for what they say or write, whether it is a government, a group or an individual who is doing the punishing,” said Anderson. “To take umbrage to the point of murder is absolutely wrong, and must not be permitted. “

Clay Calvert, the Brechner Eminent Scholar in Mass Communication and Director of the Marion B. Brechner First Amendment Project at the University of Florida, said: “No matter how offensive or disagreeable some may find the images and words of Charlie Hebdo, those images and words cannot and will not be suppressed by fanatics and terrorists.

“Like the phoenix, Charlie Hebdo rises again and, you can bet, even more people now will pay attention to it than did before,” Calvert said. “The terrorists’ actions thus have backfired, for they have now given Charlie Hebdo a much wider audience.”

The faculty and staff of the UF College of Journalism and Communications take this heartbreaking event seriously as they prepare students to tell stories in the modern world.

“Our colleagues, alumni, faculty and staff stand by the right to free speech and look forward to the positive discussions that will occur as a result of this senseless act,” McFarlin said.

Category: College News

Spiker: 17 Ways to Make a New Year’s Resolution You’ll Actually Keep

Published: January 14th, 2015

Time on December 29, 2014 published “17 Ways to Make a New Year’s Resolution You’ll Actually Keep” by Associate Professor and Interim Journalism Chair Ted Spiker.

Category: Faculty Bylines

Tampa Bay Times environmental reporter to speak at UF on Monday, Feb. 2

Published: January 13th, 2015

Craig Pittman

Craig Pittman

Tampa Bay Times environmental reporter Craig Pittman will give a public lecture at the University of Florida Monday, Feb. 2 at noon in Smathers Library (East), Room 100. Attendees are invited to bring their lunch for the discussion. The UF College of Journalism and Communications’ Hugh Cunningham Professorship in Journalism Excellence and the George A. Smathers Libraries are sponsoring the lecture.

Considered one of the nation’s top environmental reporters, Pittman shares raucous stories about the environmental beat: From covering secret Texas hunting trips paid for by sugar lobbyists to hurricanes and other disasters, natural and human-made.

He has covered environmental issues for Florida’s largest newspaper since 1998. He has won the Waldo Proffitt Award for Distinguished Environmental Journalism in Florida four times and has twice won the top investigative reporting award from the Society of Environmental Journalists.

Pittman is the author of three books, “Paving Paradise: Florida’s Vanishing Wetlands and the Failure of No Net Loss” with coauthor Matt Waite; “Manatee Insanity: Inside the War Over Florida’s Most Famous Endangered Species;” and “The Scent of Scandal: Greed, Betrayal, and the World’s Most Beautiful Orchid.”

His new book in the works is “Oh #Florida! How America’s Weirdest State Influences All the Rest.”

Pittman will be on campus to speak to students in environmental journalism courses at the College of Journalism and Communications. He can be found at http://www.facebook.com/craigtimes and http://www.twitter.com/craigtimes.

Category: College News

Calvert: Terrorists can’t kill the message

Published: January 9th, 2015

The Gainesville Sun on January 9, 2015 published “Clay Calvert: Terrorists can’t kill the message” a column by Brechner Eminent Scholar in Mass Communication Clay Calvert regarding the terrorist attack on the office of the French newspaper, Charlie Hebdo.

Category: Faculty Bylines

UPI quotes Calvert on Charlie Hebdo attack

Published: January 8th, 2015

Brechner Eminent Scholar in Mass Communication Clay Calvert is quoted in this Jan. 7, 2015 article on UPI, “Paris policewoman shot and killed day after Charlie Hebdo massacre,” regarding the importance of protecting satire, parody and free speech in the aftermath of the terrorist attack on the office of the French newspaper, Charlie Hebdo.

Calvert: Honor Charlie Hebdo: Let Satirical and Offensive Images Speak Louder Than Terrorists’ Actions

Published: January 8th, 2015

HuffPost: Politics on January 7, 2015 published “Honor Charlie Hebdo: Let Satirical and Offensive Images Speak Louder Than Terrorists’ Actions” a column by Brechner Eminent Scholar in Mass Communication Clay Calvert regarding the terrorist attack on the office of the French newspaper, Charlie Hebdo.

Category: Faculty Bylines

David Epstein to share expertise as UF Science Journalist in Residence

Published: January 6th, 2015

David Epstein

David Epstein

David Epstein, author of “The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance,” will spend Jan. 27-30 on the University of Florida campus as part of the university’s new Science Journalist in Residence Program.

A highlight of Epstein’s visit will be a public talk held on Wednesday, Jan. 28, at 6 p.m. at Gannett Auditorium in Weimer Hall on the UF campus. His topic will be “Roger vs. Tiger: Why sports science says we’re developing young athletes wrong.” A book signing will immediately follow his speech.

The Sports Gene” was a New York Times bestseller for Epstein, who has written for Sports Illustrated, Discover, Scientific American, Slate, The Washington Post, National Geographic and many other publications. He also covers energy and environmental issues and sports science for ProPublica. His TED Talk “Are athletes really getting faster, better, stronger?” has been viewed more than 1.9 million times.

The Sports GeneThe Science Journalist in Residence Program is sponsored by the UF College of Journalism and Communications, the UF Office of the Provost and the UF Office of Research. Epstein’s visit is also being supported by the Alan C. and Elizabeth Martin Moore Lecture Series from College of Health and Human Performance.

“The goal of the program is to give students and faculty the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of science journalism through interacting with some of its most captivating practitioners,” said Diane McFarlin, dean of the College. “David is ideally suited for this role, and we are thrilled that he will join us in the first year of the program.  His interest in sports science, human performance, energy, and the environment will give our students wonderful learning opportunities.”

For Epstein, he is excited at the prospect of opening a discourse with journalism students about the power and peril of communicating science.

“I think of the present as a dangerous Golden Age for science writing: There is greater necessity than ever to bridge the gap between what scientists know and what the public knows, and there are heaps of outstanding works doing just that,” said Epstein. “At the same time, much of the flood of daily science reporting serves to confuse the public about scientific findings and – often more importantly – how science fundamentally works. I hope I’ll leave campus giving at least a few journalism students a greater sense of mission, and that I’ll have gained a better understanding of the challenges facing prospective science writers.”

He authored or co-authored several of Sports Illustrated’s most high-profile investigative pieces, including the revelation that Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez tested positive for steroids in 2003; an investigation of fraudulently marketed athletic performance and healthcare remedies (including deer antler spray); and an investigation that prompted the resignation of Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel by revealing a pattern of NCAA violations during his tenure.

Highlights of the public talk:

Category: College News

Calvert: Cowardly Sony Pictures Caves: The Slippery Slope of Self-Censorship

Published: December 19th, 2014

HuffPost: Entertainment on December 18, 2014 published “Cowardly Sony Pictures Caves: The Slippery Slope of Self-Censorship” a column by Brechner Eminent Scholar in Mass Communication Clay Calvert regarding self-censorship in the Sony hacking case.

Category: Faculty Bylines

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Washington Post, TechNewsWorld quote Calvert on the Sony hack

Published: December 19th, 2014

Brechner Eminent Scholar in Mass Communication Clay Calvert is quoted in this Dec. 17, 2014 post on the Erik Wemple blog published by the Washington Post, “The Sony hack: Why would any outlet not report the sordid — and newsy — details?,” and in this Dec. 16, 2014 article in TechNewsWorld, “Sony Sends News Outlets a Stern but Toothless Warning,” regarding the publication of information in documents stolen in the Sony hacking case.

Category: The College in the News

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